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Wortley Hall Walled Garden

Working for the community with the community

Crops

The garden is still undergoing some further restoration of infrastructure, and reclaiming of very overgrown, rubble strewn areas. We have managed to grow about 5 tonnes of produce per year recently, supplying to our clients and customers 11 months of the year.
We supply regularly to businesses in the Sheffield area: Beanies Wholefoods (shop and box scheme), Regather Coop (boxscheme), New Roots (wholefood shop run by volunteers) and Barra Organics shop in Hunters Bar area. We occasionally supply the Wortley Farm Shop (local quality foods). We regularly supply the Ruddy Duck restaurant at Wortley Hall.

We also attend all Nether Edge Farmers Markets (four a year), and other occasional events.

Harvesting squash, Summer 2013.

Typical mix of salad leaves in summer 2015, which we supply to our regular buyers. By using the polytunnels as well as outdoor cultivation, we usually manage to supply salad crops for about 9 - 10 months of the year.

Lifting Sarpo mira main crop potatoes using SEP 2 wheel tractor and simple tined potato lifting attachment. This loosens soil and presents potatoes for hand gathering.

View of the North Garden looking East, with black kale and Romanesco cauliflower in foreground, hungarian grazing rye, and stable block in distance. Local pigeon and pheasant populations mean we have to net all brassicas.

Courgette flowers for Wortley Hall restaurant. You can use both male and female flowers.
Yellowstone carrots being washed down before bunching.

Ripening tomatoes.

Pea shoots and buds from heritage variety Robinson. Tasty addition to salad mixes.
Typical November scene in the polytunnels: Salad crops for harvesting from October until March, such as rocket, mizuna, wong bok, endive, spinach, cress, red mizuna, red kale.

Watercress is difficult to grow without running water through the main growing season, but performs well in a polytunnel through the autumn and spring months. Needs some protection from hard frosts during the depths of winter.

Nice bunch of French Breakfast radishes. A useful catch crop to use temporarily free space before next main crop is planted.

Squash crop being stored on roof of shipping container to finish ripening and keep away from rodents.

Trial: Leeks growing on through biodegradable corn starch mulch vs open ground. Mulched crop needs no weeding, retains moisture and shows reduced rust/fungal infection. And about a third heavier yield.

Following year in lower picture: Growing leeks exclusively through biomulch, with nitrogen-fixing clover sown on paths between strips.

Mixed salad bed, with phacelia green manure on the right (excellent forage for honey bees)

Although spring cabbage is hardy, we grow a few in the polytunnel for extra early and tender heads.

Purple skinned kohl rabi "Blue azur".

Mustard plants hung up to dry before threshing and harvesting the seed.

Getting out and about at Farmers Markets at Nether Edge, Rotherham, Penistone.

Apples for sale at Apple & Pear Day October 2015

Summer 2013. Onions raised from seed and transplanted into biomulch. Cheaper and better results than sets for us this year, and not one bolted. Most of these onions matured into large specimens weighing about 0.5kg each.

Onion crop harvested, and drying undercover.

Written by Darrell Maryon on Thursday May 12, 2016

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